<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 TRANSITIONAL//EN">
<HTML>
<HEAD>
  <META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; CHARSET=UTF-8">
  <META NAME="GENERATOR" CONTENT="GtkHTML/3.18.3">
</HEAD>
<BODY>
On Tue, 2009-06-02 at 13:08 +1000, dantian.ap@optusnet.com.au wrote:
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE>
<PRE>
Hi,
I have a bind server I now use as a caching.

In allowing my work desktop to access i found that it was being refused using allow-query, but if i add it to recursion it works, have i mis-understood the use of allow-query? The Bind Admin Manual seems to say what I thought use it to allow those to query your server.

acl "trust" { localhost; localnets; 192.168.0.0/24; 202.149.56.199; };
options {
        directory "/var/named/zones";
        allow-query { trust; };
        allow-query-cache  { trust; };
        allow-transfer { none; };
        allow-recursion { admin; };
        listen-on { any; };
        transfer-format many-answers;
        interface-interval 0;
};


Now this works well for LAN, but 202.149.. can not get answer, If I change ACL admin to trust it works (only difference between them is 202 IP is not in admin)

So this I ask, does mean allow-query is useless now days?
Or is this only of any use if my server is also authoritative ?
Do I even need query since recursive decides who can query my server?
</PRE>
</BLOCKQUOTE>
<BR>
Chris summed it up well, so basically, remove the recursion control, yes it defaults to allowing "any", but since your allow-query already guards who can ask and get answers and who wont get answers, you don't really need it, its over complicating your setup.<BR>
<BR>
</BODY>
</HTML>