<div dir="ltr"><div><div>Thank you for your reply.<br><br></div>The issue is, I do not know what other services/targets will need to be started prior to BIND starting. In other words, I have no idea how to set up the unit file for BIND. <br><br></div>Thanks<br><br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Apr 25, 2016 at 12:09 PM, Anand Buddhdev <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:anandb@ripe.net" target="_blank">anandb@ripe.net</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">On 25/04/16 17:59, Sean Son wrote:<br>
<br>
Hi Sean Son,<br>
<span class=""><br>
> I know I emailed the list about compiling BIND on a SystemD distro earlier<br>
> last month. This time I have a different question. After I compile BIND9 on<br>
> CentOS 7 , how do I get it to start up at boot time and how do I restart<br>
> it? I don't want to have to write a systemd unit configuration file for it.<br>
> I want it to run using a boot script or some other way that will allow BIND<br>
> to start up at boot and also allow the system administrator to restart BIND<br>
> if it ever stops running.<br>
<br>
</span>A systemd unit file is the *easiest* and *simplest* way to get BIND to<br>
start at boot. Is there any reason you don't want to use systemd? It's<br>
not difficult at all. You just a few lines in a file to create a system<br>
unit.<br>
<br>
If you don't want systemd to restart BIND if it crashes, then you can<br>
just set:<br>
<br>
Restart=no<br>
<br>
Then, you can start BIND by hand with "systemctl start <unitname>".<br>
<br>
Regards,<br>
Anand<br>
</blockquote></div><br></div>