<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div><div class="gmail_signature"><br></div></div><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Apr 27, 2016 at 11:39 AM, John R. Levine <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:johnl@iecc.com" target="_blank">johnl@iecc.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><span class=""><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
At the same time, the browser developers, almost without exception, refuse<br>
to implement SRV because they don't like the idea that they might have to<br>
do another DNS lookup prior to displaying a web page.  And they lobby the<br>
W3C pretty hard to not standardize SRV for HTTP.<br>
<br>
That's a pretty serious impasse .. and one that I think is only going to be<br>
overcome by an equally strong lobbying movement from the DNS hosting<br>
industry, when we get tired of trying to educate end users on why CNAME at<br>
apex won't work (end users who don't–and shouldn't need to–care), and get<br>
tired of maintaining messy record synthesis processes.<br>
</blockquote>
<br></span>
I don't think that's a fight you're going to win.  The ANAME kludge is ugly, but it's straightforward and a whole lot of DNS operators (including me) do it.<br>
<br>
R's,<br>
john<br><br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I realize that ANAME seems like a kludge, but if we could make it a standard, and get the various DNS software (auth, resolvers, and clients) to understand it, it would solve a major limitation in DNS.</div><div><br></div><div>-- </div><div>Bob Harold</div><div><br></div></div><br></div></div>