<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:tahoma,sans-serif">Thanks to everyone that help me!!!</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:tahoma,sans-serif"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:tahoma,sans-serif">The Grant Taylor tuto works like a charm!!! :)</div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">On Fri, Jul 27, 2018 at 7:12 PM Grant Taylor via bind-users <<a href="mailto:bind-users@lists.isc.org">bind-users@lists.isc.org</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">On 07/27/2018 09:59 AM, Elias Pereira wrote:<br>
> hello,<br>
<br>
Hi,<br>
<br>
> Can an authoritative dns for a domain, eg mydomain.tdl, have a hostname, <br>
> example, wordpress.mydomain.tdl with a private IP?<br>
<br>
Yes, an authoritative DNS server can have a private <br>
(non-globally-routed) IP address in the zone data.<br>
<br>
However, there is a catch.<br>
<br>
> Would this be accessible from the internet via hostname, if I did a nat <br>
> on the firewall?<br>
<br>
It would (extremely likely) ONLY be accessible from the private <br>
(non-globally-routed) LAN.  Even that wouldn't require NAT because <br>
clients would be on the LAN and access it directly without passing <br>
through the NAT router.<br>
<br>
I don't think this will do what (I'm guessing) you want to do.<br>
<br>
I suspect you want to have a server with a private IP be accessible via <br>
domain name from outside the network.<br>
<br>
To do this, do the following things:<br>
<br>
1)  Enter the outside static IP address of the NAT in DNS for the hostname.<br>
2)  Configure NAT to (port) forward the traffic you are interested in <br>
from the outside into the server's internal IP.<br>
<br>
This will allow the world to access the service(s) in question.<br>
<br>
To help the internal clients, set up an additional DNS zone (that is <br>
only accessed by internal clients) that is the FQDN of the hostname and <br>
put an A / AAAA record in the zone's apex that resolves to the internal IP.<br>
<br>
;<br>
; External / Global / Public DNS zone file for <a href="http://example.net" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">example.net</a><br>
;<br>
$ORIGIN <a href="http://example.net" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">example.net</a>.<br>
...<br>
myservice       IN      A       203.0.113.123<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
;<br>
; Internal / Private DNS zone file for <a href="http://service.example.net" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">service.example.net</a><br>
;<br>
$ORIGIN <a href="http://myservice.example.net" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">myservice.example.net</a>.<br>
                IN      A       192.168.1.234<br>
<br>
<br>
This will cause the world to resolve <a href="http://myservice.example.net" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">myservice.example.net</a>. to <br>
203.0.113.123 and clients inside the LAN to resolve <br>
<a href="http://myservice.example.net" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">myservice.example.net</a>. to 192.168.1.234.<br>
<br>
I'm assuming that NAT is configured to port forward the desired ports <br>
for 203.0.113.123 to 192.168.1.234.<br>
<br>
I think this will do what I think you are wanting to do.<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
-- <br>
Grant. . . .<br>
unix || die<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Please visit <a href="https://lists.isc.org/mailman/listinfo/bind-users" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://lists.isc.org/mailman/listinfo/bind-users</a> to unsubscribe from this list<br>
<br>
bind-users mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:bind-users@lists.isc.org" target="_blank">bind-users@lists.isc.org</a><br>
<a href="https://lists.isc.org/mailman/listinfo/bind-users" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://lists.isc.org/mailman/listinfo/bind-users</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_signature" data-smartmail="gmail_signature">Elias Pereira</div>