<div class="gmail_quote">2011/7/7 Barry Stear <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:bstear@gmail.com">bstear@gmail.com</a>></span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
<br><div>That makes sense about the routing. Obviously I need to get my routing straightened out and then I will be "golden".</div>
<div> </div>
<div>What I am trying to accomplish is I want to separate unknown clients from known clients and only provide the unknown clients with Internet access but not allow them access to any samba shares on the network. I was thinking denying a subnet would be easier then denying a range of ips. I realize now that I might have made this more difficuly then needed.  I want to be able to VPN into the server as well which I think puts me in the same boat where I need a separate subnet for those clients. </div>


<div> </div>
<div>I appreciate all the help and suggestions everyone has made.</div><br></blockquote></div><br>Suggestions...<br><br>1. Change your router from the Linux box to a L3 Switch, and create separate VLANs for the internal/external users. Or...<br>
<br>2. Create a secondary address on your Linux box, acting as gateway for the external users' address space.<br>i.e.<br><br>sudo ip addr add <a href="http://192.168.100.1/24">192.168.100.1/24</a> dev eth0<br><br>This way, you'll have a true shared network, so you can serve 192.168.100.* addresses on your dhcp server.<br>
It may work, but I think it's a dirty solution.<br>