<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <br>
    <blockquote
      cite="mid:FD06A58F-482E-4DFE-9296-0C5032BC1223@nominum.com"
      type="cite">
      <div>
        <div> wrote:</div>
        <blockquote type="cite"><span style="font-family: Helvetica;
            font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal;
            font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height:
            normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent:
            0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2;
            word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto;
            -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important;
            float: none; ">I think you still need an upper limit.
            Whether weeks or months, at some point it needs to be
            capped.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></span><br
            class="Apple-interchange-newline">
        </blockquote>
        <br>
      </div>
      <div>I would expect that the limit for a wifi hotspot would need
        to be quite a bit lower—it seems to me that you're saving a very
        small amount of DHCP traffic, at the expense of potential
        address starvation if too many devices get long leases before
        they leave.</div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    Right, but on a wifi hotspot you're probably just as well off with
    nothing more complex than a short lease time.  This concept would
    only be useful on a network large enough that frequent DHCP renewals
    are putting a major load on the network or DHCP server.  For the
    majority of us, it wouldn't really be necessary.  <br>
    Pie hole is now closing....back to work.<br>
  </body>
</html>