<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Feb 7, 2014 at 11:47 AM, Simon Hobson <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:dhcp1@thehobsons.co.uk" target="_blank">dhcp1@thehobsons.co.uk</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">John Miller <<a href="mailto:johnmill@brandeis.edu">johnmill@brandeis.edu</a>> wrote:<br>
<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Thanks for the reply, Simon.  <br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
> In my test system, it appears that if an address is part of a dynamic pool, its associated DNS records will be deleted when the IP is freed for use.<br>
<br>
Correct<br> 
<br></blockquote><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
> With hosts configured using the 'fixed-address' parameter, however, associated DNS records do not appear to be deleted when the host in question has its lease expired.<br>
<br>
They aren't added by default either. Host statements with a fixed address do not result in a lease being created, by default there is no DNS update, and because there is no lease to expire there will be no DNS removal at the end of the lease.<br>
</blockquote><div><br></div><div>Gotcha.  So using "update-static-leases" will result in names being created, but since there is no lease, the names will not be deleted?<br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<br>
> ... if we expand a dynamic pool to include some previously reserved addresses, do we then need to manually clean up DNS to remove the old fixed-address A and TXT records?<br>
<br>
Yes<br>
<br>
However, current versions now support a "reserved" status for a lease. The only way to set it is to add the reserved keyword to a lease - either by editing the leases file (or using OMAPI ?). But once set, the lease then behaves as any other lease (DDNS updates, lease expiry etc) apart from being tied to a specific client.<br>

For some uses, this may be more appropriate than host statements.<br>
<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Indeed it does sound more appropriate than using existing host blocks.  I'll give this a try right now and see how it works.  Thank you for the suggestion!<br><br></div><div>John<br>
</div><br></div></div></div>