<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><br></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">Em ter., 11 de mai. de 2021 ├ás 19:04, Louis Garcia <<a href="mailto:louisgtwo@gmail.com">louisgtwo@gmail.com</a>> escreveu:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><br>
Currently I have three networks <a href="http://172.16.2.0/24" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">172.16.2.0/24</a> <a href="http://172.16.3.0/24" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">172.16.3.0/24</a><br>
<a href="http://172.16.4.0/24" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">172.16.4.0/24</a>. I read that not all of 172.16.0.0 is private, only<br>
<a href="http://172.16.0.0/12" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">172.16.0.0/12</a>. I am trying to not have public routable IPs on my<br>
network. Please let me know if this setup is fine.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>172.16.0.0 <b>is all private</b>. <br></div><div><br></div><div>As so is 172.17. 172.18 ando so on, until 172.31.0.0. In fact, the reserved address space starts on 172.16.0.1 and goes all the way through 172.31.255.254. This is what the "/12" prefix means. Note that bigger networks use smaller prefixes, and smaller networks use bigger prefixes.<br></div><div><br></div><div>Your networks <a href="http://172.16.2.0/24">172.16.2.0/24</a>, <a href="http://172.16.3.0/24">172.16.3.0/24</a> and <a href="http://172.16.4.0/24">172.16.4.0/24</a> are a tiny portion of the original network. In fact, you could easily use the "255.255.248.0" (/21) netmask to describe them.</div><div><br></div></div></div>