innd resource performance question

Russ Allbery rra at stanford.edu
Mon Sep 22 21:48:58 UTC 2003


Jennifer Luisi <jlui at ats.rochester.edu> writes:

> Hmm, my db dir looks like this:

> total 305487
> -rw-rw-r--    1 news     news       252787 Sep 22 03:06 active
> -rw-rw-r--    1 news     news       252734 Jul 24 10:13 active.old
> -rw-r--r--    1 news     news           84 Jul 24 10:13 active.times
> -rw-rw-r--    1 news     news     248833806 Sep 22 17:36 history
> -rw-rw-r--    1 news     news          108 Sep 22 17:36 history.dir
> -rw-rw-r--    1 news     news     37570200 Sep 22 06:00 history.hash
> -rw-rw-r--    1 news     news     25046800 Sep 22 04:45 history.index
> drwxr-xr-x    2 root     root           96 May 29 16:08 lost+found
> -rw-r--r--    1 news     news          333 May 28 16:21 newsgroups

So there's about 60MB of memory-mapped files there, which is probably why
you're seeing the memory usage that you're seeing.  Chances are, this
isn't actually much of an impact on the performance of the system.

The size of your history file seems fairly typical to me.  The history
file on my reader system, which only has one feed and only sees articles I
actually carry, is about 380MB.

> Old articles are automagically expired out of history by the expire.ctl
> setting when news.daily runs, right?  My expire.ctl says: /remember/:7.

Right.

> I don't know how to check on a memory-mapped file size, though it seems
> like a useful concept.  Any quick pointers?

It's very platform-specific.  On Solaris, /usr/proc/bin/pmap will give
that information.  It looks like Linux also has the same command.

-- 
Russ Allbery (rra at stanford.edu)             <http://www.eyrie.org/~eagle/>

    Please send questions to the list rather than mailing me directly.
     <http://www.eyrie.org/~eagle/faqs/questions.html> explains why.


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